Teaching the Essence of Wildlife Photography

 

Beaver photographed in darkness across the lake May 2018 © Stephen Bruno

I am frequently asked about my approach to teaching wildlife photography. I have a different perspective on teaching photography classes and workshops. Drawing on my writing, art, and photography background my teaching emphasis is on spontaneous natural creativity and systematic technology.

I believe that it is the craft of ‘process,’ that creates the art of photography. Regardless of the technical acumen, the camera cannot tell the photographer what to include in the composition. No matter how advanced the camera is, it cannot create a connection with the subject nor show when to press the shutter button.

I teach The Essence of Wildlife Photography for beginner, intermediate and newly professional level photography enthusiasts primarily for people with DSLR cameras and compact cameras that offer some setting options. People with point and shoot cameras without setting options will still learn many valuable photography principles.

Included in the easy to learn field instruction on wildlife photography are natural non-threatening wildlife approaches, and camera settings (ISO, white balance, shutter speed, aperture, shooting modes: manual vs. aperture and priority vs. shutter priority, etc.). Instruction also includes learning how to hold the camera steady, obtaining clear images of birds in flight, using a variety of background effects, and creative use of the composition.

I teach wildlife photography in a patient, compassionate, and thorough manner with easy to follow instructions using lecture, demonstration and hands-on approaches tailored to the students. I photograph to be surprised and delighted!

The emphasis is on practical field practice. I share numerous professional tips and techniques from my many years’ experience of wildlife photography from film to digital. Students are encouraged to bring their digital camera, owner’s manual, plenty of charged batteries, and extra storage media.

I have a very relaxed, yet aware personal teaching style that allows me to be present with each participant since I do not have an agenda or itinerary to follow. I do want to inspire their passion, vision, and creativity and motivate them to become the photographer that they desire to be. I want to encourage their photographic inquiries and share knowledge in an easy, flowing, uncomplicated manner. Show students how to see through the eyes of an artist.

In the photography excursions that I facilitate in Cedaredge, Colorado, I know that it is all about the process of relationships that makes a difference in quality photography, including the relationship of connections, process, communication, space, light, and even unfamiliarity.

The camaraderie of other participants is a valuable part of the learning process. Nurturing new friendships that emerge from these classes and workshops. We all learn by different means. Some of us are best with auditory learning, and others learn best by visual means. Fewer prefer both auditory and visual.

Talking about what we are doing as we do it has proven to be an effective approach. Demonstration by example combines both the auditory and visual which is one reason why I take photographs right next to each of the participants and share the reasons for my approach and camera settings.

I photographed the Beaver across the lake in Colorado one evening as the sun set when I was donating my time to teach other Veterans how to photograph wildlife. It was an opportunity to discuss the challenges of photographing wildlife in darkness.

 

 

Book Review: Arizona Highways Photography Guide

311LwS+eEzL

I understand that creating a great photograph requires the process of numerous elements happening with synchronicity. I recently read this revised “Arizona Highways Photography Guide.” As a primarily wildlife and nature photographer, I agree with the information this book presents on how to take great photographs. Recognized internationally for their exceptional photography, the Arizona Highways Magazine highlights wonderful photographs in each issue. Currently, one of my photographs of an Osprey in-flight is accepted in the Arizona Highways Magazine’s 2014-2015 7th Annual Arizona Highways Photo Contest. Here is a link to the photograph.

I have taught many people, in my photography workshops and classes, how to use their camera to create powerful photographs. In this paperback book, there is quality information about digital and film photography and the essential elements necessary to prepare your camera for the best possible photographs. It also covers filters, ISO, aperture, shutter speed, tripods, exposure, lighting action shots, artistic dimensions, packing your camera bag and more.

Several chapters cover different types of photography including landscape, close-up, depth of field, wildlife, architecture, and travel. You learn the difference between taking a snapshot and creating a photograph. Developing the highest quality photography requires practice. Many hours of practice applying different skills and approaches. This book offers you diverse exercises to improve your skills and encourage them to become second nature.

I have lived in many different states and have purchased similar books created by photographers who are familiar with the best places to take photographs. These have saved a lot of time scouting new locations and offering their expertise in the time of day, settings and other important information. Perhaps the most significant part of this book, tailored for people who live in Arizona or plan to visit; the book describes a number of terrific locations to photograph. These include the Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, Navajoland, Red Rock Country of Sedona, Mountain Country and the Sonoran Desert.

Whether you are an amateur or professional photographer you will find effective tips and recommendations for when and where to photograph. There is additional information about settings. I have photographed wildlife, architecture, and nature in many of the locations presented in this book. You will find concise and informative content that will make you a better photographer. Many of the recommendations are what I have found to be true by trial and error on my own photography adventures. You do not need to be Arizona resident or even visit the state to find the concepts and tips of value to apply wherever you are.

I have read numerous books on different aspects of photography for many years. Some are very complex books covering in-depth concepts. Others offer a focus in specific areas. I am completing my own book focusing on wildlife photography based on my many years sharing time in nature with a variety of wildlife. I find the “Arizona Highways Photography Guide” to be a general approach to photography with an emphasis on Arizona locations. Whether you are amateur, intermediate or professional photographer this book will offer you guidance in becoming a better photographer.

Prescott Wildlife & Nature Photography Workshop

_DSC9363 copy

Osprey 2014 © Stephen Bruno

I am confirming who is attending my Prescott Wildlife & Nature photography workshop held on Saturday, June 14, 2014, from 9 am – 1 pm at Lynx Lake

From this South Shore initial location, I can sometimes see the bald Eagle sitting atop a tall tree. Other times there may be a great blue heron or a snowy egret in the small lagoon. I have also photographed an osprey fishing in the same area.

A reminder that the fee is only $25 cash which you can pay the day of the workshop. As you know, I wanted to offer this workshop so that it is affordable to most anyone who wants to learn how to take wonderful pictures. This is much less than my all day photography workshops. You can click on my http://www.stephenbrunophotography.com/ link to view my portfolio to see the quality of photographs that you will learn to take.

This definitely is a hands-on workshop where we all will be photographing and discussing each shoot with different approaches, styles, and settings. I’ll post the images that I take on my photography website.

As I have shared before this is not primarily a technical workshop, I will show you how to use your specific camera to photograph wildlife up close without being too intrusive and how to take beautiful nature photography. I’ll share many photography tips that I have learned over the numerous years as a professional photographer.

Any camera will be fine. Bring the manual of your camera if you have one. Tripods are not necessary but feel free to bring one if you like.

Please confirm that you will be attending the workshop. Since the fee is so small I’m not asking for a deposit. Send me an e-mail at stephenbruno@yahoo.com.

I photographed this Osprey at the South Shore last year.

http://www.stephenbrunophotography.com/

Curious Naturalist: The Art of Observation

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle 2014 © Stephen Bruno

Over my many years of nature and wildlife photography in numerous locations, I have become a curious naturalist. I know a lot about birds and animals because I have studied them for years. Whenever I photograph something new, I return home to my study and thoroughly research them.

I find it interesting that frequently people are in such a hurry to walk through the forest, country, and desert that they appear to miss so many opportunities to observe nature and wildlife. Visit my photography website and view a slideshow of my photography. http://www.stephenbrunophotography.com/.

Once I was photographing a large tarantula when an older couple walked by and the man quickly took a twig and scooted the tarantula off the path and into a pile of leaves. The woman glanced at my raised camera and me and asked if I was photographing the tarantula. I lied and told her no, that I was just observing it. It did not seem to matter much to explain how he interfered with my observation and photography.

Another time I was photographing an Osprey that I had tracked around a lake to a tree high above a well-worn path. Just as I had raised my camera with a telephoto lens and was focusing in on the Osprey eating a rainbow trout, a family walked rapidly passed me talking loudly as they neared the large tree with the Osprey. Unfortunately, the bird became nervous and flew to the other side of the lake. Although disappointing that I had missed the opportunity to photograph the bird that I had pursued so vigilantly, I was amazed that the family never even noticed the Osprey.

There is so much to see when we are in nature if we have the patience and presence to observe. Most people now have a cell phone with reasonable photography capability or a compact camera. If you are not a photographer or prefer to draw, sketch the wildlife that you see and note the location.

Walk with someone who can point out things of interest in the field and explain simple, useful identifying characteristics.This is one reason why I offer photography workshops. http://www.stephenbrunophotography.com/Photography-Workshops

People who view my wildlife photography frequently ask how I get so close to photograph wildlife.

Below are a few of my approaches to photographing wildlife close up:

  • Shifting between my vision, hearing, smell, touch, and taste.
  • Stopping at the nearest desert, forestry office or interpretive center to pick up brochures, trail maps, and wildlife checklists. Asking about any recent wildlife sightings.
  • Following my intuition. If the hair on the back of my neck stands up, wildlife could be near!
  • Being mindful of recent weather and knowing that temperature, sunlight, and precipitation all factor into reading tracks and wildlife behavior.

Continue reading