Humanity: Priceless

Many years ago, I was a vegan; I ran 16 miles several times a week along the canals in Phoenix Arizona. This was the healthiest time in my life. In the years since that time, I have experienced many life changes and challenges just like most of you. I find myself moving closer to becoming a vegan again even though I occasionally have other cravings. I now juice frequently, use a pressure cooker to steam vegetables and eat more salads. Sometimes when I have a craving for fast food I use a strategy that seems to be a benefit as well as compassionate.

I will order as healthy and natural a hamburger as I can find and place the bag on the passenger seat of my vehicle. For a number of reasons, this seems to satisfy my craving. I then look for individuals or families who I believe could use a meal. Unfortunately, I do not need to look far to find someone holding up a sign or sitting near a fast food restaurant.

I will drive up to these people, get out of my car and connect with them in conversation. I ask them if I may share the meal that I purchased. If they inquire, I will explain why I am offering them the meal. I chat with them a little longer and then drive away. I feel that I have accomplished keeping to my preferred diet while serving others a meal that they certainly can use. Continue reading

Continuing Photography Adventures

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Great Horned Owl 2015 © Stephen Bruno

This is a wonderful time of year for amateur and professional photographers to photograph wildlife and nature. During my numerous walks and hikes along the many Northern Arizona trails and sometimes, bushwhacking, I observed much wildlife. Some of these are in plain sight and most of them require practiced observation. Sometimes, simply being present allows one to see wildlife. Frequently, I watch people who walk under around and nearby interesting wildlife. They do this without even noticing what was there. When it seems appropriate, I point out the wildlife.

Some of my knowledge and skills in wildlife photography is the result of watching predators searching and tracking prey. This combined with my naturalist curiosity and knowledge has led to many fascinating experiences and wonderful photography opportunities.

In the future, I will write a question and answer article about photographing wildlife and then, posting it on this blog. This will include questions posed to me over the years. Other questions are what I learned are essential for photographing wildlife.

I am taking names again for those of you, who want to learn how to find, track and photograph wildlife in Northern Arizona. The Field Wildlife Photography Workshop, based on my many professional years’ experience as a wildlife photographer, is on Saturday, March 28, 2015. It is $45 cash for about 4-5 hours not counting travel time. We can car pool if not in Prescott. The last time I recently took a couple of people out (not a workshop), we found and photographed a Bald Eagle, Great Blue Heron, and American Coots within the first hour. Please send me an e-mail to stephenbruno@yahoo.com. You can call 928 458-5737.

This week, I will be visiting Bearizona again to take more wildlife photography. I am looking forward to taking some creative and dramatic photographs of the wildlife. It is always wonderful when I can connect with and photograph their essence. I will upload the images on my photography website listed below and post a link on my Stephen Bruno Photography Facebook page.  Like and follow this Facebook page to receive notifications of future posts. Additionally, during the next few months, I will be photographing wildlife at the local Northern Arizona lakes, rivers and creeks. In the near future, I plan photography at the Grand Canyon. Most of these photography adventures I will do on my own and some, I open to others.

http://www.stephenbrunophotography.com/

Book Review: Arizona Highways Photography Guide

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I understand that creating a great photograph requires the process of numerous elements happening with synchronicity. I recently read this revised “Arizona Highways Photography Guide.” As a primarily wildlife and nature photographer, I agree with the information this book presents on how to take great photographs. Recognized internationally for their exceptional photography, the Arizona Highways Magazine highlights wonderful photographs in each issue. Currently, one of my photographs of an Osprey in-flight is accepted in the Arizona Highways Magazine’s 2014-2015 7th Annual Arizona Highways Photo Contest. Here is a link to the photograph.

I have taught many people, in my photography workshops and classes, how to use their camera to create powerful photographs. In this paperback book, there is quality information about digital and film photography and the essential elements necessary to prepare your camera for the best possible photographs. It also covers filters, ISO, aperture, shutter speed, tripods, exposure, lighting action shots, artistic dimensions, packing your camera bag and more.

Several chapters cover different types of photography including landscape, close-up, depth of field, wildlife, architecture, and travel. You learn the difference between taking a snapshot and creating a photograph. Developing the highest quality photography requires practice. Many hours of practice applying different skills and approaches. This book offers you diverse exercises to improve your skills and encourage them to become second nature.

I have lived in many different states and have purchased similar books created by photographers who are familiar with the best places to take photographs. These have saved a lot of time scouting new locations and offering their expertise in the time of day, settings and other important information. Perhaps the most significant part of this book, tailored for people who live in Arizona or plan to visit; the book describes a number of terrific locations to photograph. These include the Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, Navajoland, Red Rock Country of Sedona, Mountain Country and the Sonoran Desert.

Whether you are an amateur or professional photographer you will find effective tips and recommendations for when and where to photograph. There is additional information about settings. I have photographed wildlife, architecture, and nature in many of the locations presented in this book. You will find concise and informative content that will make you a better photographer. Many of the recommendations are what I have found to be true by trial and error on my own photography adventures. You do not need to be Arizona resident or even visit the state to find the concepts and tips of value to apply wherever you are.

I have read numerous books on different aspects of photography for many years. Some are very complex books covering in-depth concepts. Others offer a focus in specific areas. I am completing my own book focusing on wildlife photography based on my many years sharing time in nature with a variety of wildlife. I find the “Arizona Highways Photography Guide” to be a general approach to photography with an emphasis on Arizona locations. Whether you are amateur, intermediate or professional photographer this book will offer you guidance in becoming a better photographer.

Needs No Explanation

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While I was growing up my brother, eight years older than me, would sometimes buy me gifts that he especially liked, for Christmas when he had some extra money. Whether it was a box kite or remote control car, he would always demonstrate the proper way to use it without giving me an opportunity to try it first. He would set it up, try it out, and then promptly break it before I even had a chance to try it out myself.

One Christmas when I was in elementary school, I decided to change this pattern. He gave me a gift of a plastic soldier on a gas-powered flying hovercraft platform that came with a remote control. He set everything up, fueled it and just before he launched it, I grabbed the remote control and immediately sent it straight up as high as it would go. While he watched, his mouth open in shock, I decidedly powered it straight down into the alley asphalt until it hit with a terrific explosion. He remained standing with his mouth agape; he turned and looked down at me shaking his head in stunned disbelief. I smiled and walked away delighted. This was the last Christmas gift he ever bought me, and the best Christmas I ever had as a child.

Praying Mantis vs Mosquito

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While serving 14 months in the U.S. Army in Vietnam my fellow soldiers and I experienced frequent rocket attacks around 2:00 AM to 6:00 AM while sleeping in our hooch. Of course, it was unnerving. All we could do was wait until the rockets stopped hitting our compound. Each of us knew that if even if a single rocket landed nearby, most of us would die.

Initially, I crawled under the small army cot just like everyone else, banging my shins and head and waiting for the end of the rocket attack. It didn’t take long for me to figure out that I might just as well lie down on the cot and count the rockets, as there usually were the same number each morning, rather than banging my body trying to get under the cot that provided no protection anyway.

During the day and early evening mosquitoes, carrying a variety of diseases including malaria besieged us. I decided on a creative method to stop the mosquito attacks that kept me awake. I explored the insects indigenous to the area and found that the Praying Mantises in Vietnam were rather large and voracious.

After catching a large Praying Mantis, I tried sewing thread around its thorax and then on objects in the hooch where I lived. There was enough thread for the Praying Mantis to have a great deal of mobility. Initially, I provided water and other insects for it to eat. Eventually, it lived quite well eating the mosquitoes that swarmed around the hooch.

I found a large beaker from the medevac hospital nearby and began raising Praying Mantises. I learned a lot about how they mated, what they ate and how they bushwhacked and ate insects. I learned the best way to feed and provide water for them while they grew.

It was a fascinating experience and stimulated my interest as a naturalist in my off-duty time. The greatest benefit was that I no longer had to worry about mosquitoes buzzing around trying to bite me.

I apologize for the quality of the photographs that somehow survived after all these years. You can click on each image to view it larger. The top image is of a Praying Mantis in its home in my hooch. The bottom image is of two Praying Mantises in the beaker. The images do not do justice to how large and beautiful these Praying Mantises were.